Lovely sunset

Lovely sunset

Saturday, September 14, 2013

If my feet could talk..2 weeks of school in the books

If my feet could talk, they would be hoarse. I think the sound would be barely audible and tremulous. (a word I taught this week in my class) I would have to strain and work to hear what they had to say and then I would hear begging, I believe. They would be imploring me to work less, to sit more, and to avoid those hard classroom floors. They would plead for more time spent in the rocking chair in my reading area.



They would be suggesting better shoes, my sneakers perhaps and advising me to choose them more often in the morning as I dress.They would wonder why I ever take off my Dansko shoes and wear something else when I know how darn comfortable they are. They would ignore my complaints about the price responding simply, "You get what you pay for.." That is the truth there.

If my feet could talk, they might be apologizing for being so cranky. They would point out that being 53 years old isn't easy on the feet, you know. They would remind me of the years of waitressing when my feet were never a worry to me. They held me well then and never complained one bit. They would remind me of the years of sports competitions where I shoved them into ill fitting cleats designed by and for men/boys. More than 35 years of running, jogging, sprinting, kicking, sliding...well you get the idea. Mostly all thanks to titleix. I was one of those girls who got to play sports in high school in 1975-1978 all as a result of Title IX. My feet were more than happy to oblige (another word I taught this week) at the time as we took to the practice fields right next to the boys teams.

If my feet could talk today they would urge (another new word) me to find a foot massage today. They would whisper gently but insistently (yes, one more) that just a short massage would do wonders to rehabilitate them for next week. My feet would not care that there is no one in my house that will do that for me. They would stand firm (ha.) and compel me to find someone to pamper them.

If my feet could talk they would likely tell me to suck it up! What did I expect when I took this job? Was I unaware that teaching could not be done sitting down? Well, then. It is what it is. My feet would softly suggest I stop dwelling on them, take a few Advil, and enjoy the weekend. Maybe, just maybe, enjoy it from a seated position. Just saying, They could use a rest, you know.

4 comments:

  1. My feet can relate! During my my first few years of teaching I saw more experienced teachers suffer through many foot problems with inserts and even surgery. After that, I decided good shoes were worth the expense. Fifteen years later, my feet are still going strong, but they are tired at the end of the day!

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    1. I now own 3 pairs of Dansko closed toe shoes and 3 pairs of sandals. That alone amounts to over $600. in shoes. And though I love them, I can't say they are really that attractive. I just know they are like medicine for my feet. :)

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  2. I feel your pain! Literally. It's been two weeks for me too, and I've worn 3 different pairs of sandals and two pairs of shoes to school (One new pair that isn't broken in yet; oh how my feet hurt at the end of that day!).
    There really is no sitting down in teaching, but heck, we love it regardless, right?

    I enjoyed this post and especially the way you infused it with your two weeks worth of vocabulary lessons. Did you just randomly choose these words? Did they surface during the day's conversations in class? I'd love to hear more.

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    1. The words came from two stories I started with to demonstrate "Close Reading." Together we read, "The Man, The Tiger and The Jackal" a trickster type folk tale that was above grade level by a good amount. Then we read "The Peasant and the Emperor" from The Book of Virtues. We worked through how to decipher words we don't know so as not to freak out when there are many of them. We first read for understanding of the story, then for unfamiliar vocab. then to